Żagań

Żagań is situated at the southern end of Lubusz Province, in the borderland between the Silesian-Lusatian Lowlands and the Trzebnicki Ridge, by the Bóbr River and its tributary – the Czerna Wielka River. According to a legend, the settlement was established around 700 A.D., by a Slavic princess Żaganna, who was the daughter of the legendary Princess Wanda and the granddaughter of Prince Krakus (the legendary king and founder of Kraków).

Żagań was first mentioned in written documents in 1202, and referred to as a castellan’s stronghold. The stronghold was most likely situated within a distance of 1.5km from the future location of the town itself and its aim was to guard the crossing that connected Greater Poland to Germany. Żagań was granted its borough rights sometime between 1248 and 1260. At the end of the 12th Century, Żagań became the capital of the Duchy of Żagań ruled by representatives of the Silesian Piast line. In that period of time, a castle and a Franciscan monastery were erected on the outskirts of the town. In 1472, the duchy was sold to the dukes of Saxony, and then passed from hands to hands. Its successive owners were representatives of the House of Habsburg, and later members of the House of Lobkowicz noble family. In 1785, Żagań was bought by the Duke of Courland and Semigallia Peter von Biron, and the town had remained in the hands of his descendants, until 1935. After the end of the Second World War, the town was incorporated into the territory of Poland.

Żagań was and still is commonly associated as home of a military garrison. Starting in the second half of the 19th Century, many armies stationed in the local garrison: first the German army, then the Russian army, and the Polish People’s Army – today, it is a garrison of the Polish Army and NATO soldiers.

Żagań can boast about many historic monuments that tell of the past magnificence of the town, when it was an important centre of culture. Among the most noteworthy ones, there is the Post-Augustinian Monastery Complex founded in the 14th Century and then converted many times, until the 18th Century, the Post-Franciscan monastery, and the castle complex located at ul. Szprotawska.

Żagań was largely destroyed during the Second World War, and it had not been until the mid-1960s that the town was finally reconstructed after the turmoil of war. So, it is no coincidence that it was often chosen as a location for shooting war films. It became a film set for the first episodes of the television series ‘Czterej pancerni i pies / Four tank-men and a dog’ (filmed in the years 1966-1970) directed by Konrad Nałęcki. Seven out of the eight episodes of the first season of the series were shot on locations in Żagań. In 1965, Janusz Morgenstern and his film crew arrived in Żagań to shoot the film ‘Potem nastąpi cisza / And All Will Be Quiet’. The film ‘Yuma’ (2012) by Piotr Mularuk was also filmed in Żagań, although in quite a different landscape.

Potem nastąpi cisza
Potem nastapi cisza

Potem nastąpi cisza

dir. Janusz Morgenstern

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Potem nastąpi cisza
Zdjęcie ilustracja

Potem nastąpi cisza

dir. Janusz Morgenstern

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Czterej pancerni i pies
Zdjęcie ilustracja

Czterej pancerni i pies

Tv series

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Yuma
Zdjęcie ilustracja

Yuma

dir. Piotr Mularuk

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